Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Networking > Hardware > Switch

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Networking > Hardware > Switch

    I added a shipping workstation in the warehouse and looks like they want to put 3 label printers out there. I have one network jack and don't want to run more wire as this place is a minefield and I'm dealing with two pending trade shows. I was thinking of a switch. My understanding is a dumb switch randomly assigns IP's and I'd like to keep the static local IP so figuring I would have to use a smart switch or managed switch. Not much experience in this area - just want simplest way to plug in my network cable and assign an IP to each port. Any suggestions? I guess a router or even a firewall might be able to handle this in a pinch but looking for simplest setup and configuration - not a networking pro here.

    Thanks.
    Last edited by habreu; 08-14-19, 09:42 AM.

  • you mean you don't have any 12 year old kids working in the warehouse that could set that up for you?
    Bruce Golub
    Phosphor Media - "Your Success is our Business"

    Improve Your Customer Service | Get MORE Customers | Edit CSS/Javascript/HTML Easily | Make Your Site Faster | Get Indexed by Google | Free Modules | Follow Us on Facebook
    phosphormedia.com

    Comment


    • I was going to say 'no because then he'd be gunning for my job' but not sure that would be a bad thing.

      Comment


      • I assume you are behind a router, so you have a private network that communicates through a public IP (your static IP assigned by your ISP). It doesn't generally matter one bit what goes on within your private network. A dumb switch is exactly what you need.
        Gordon Currie
        Phosphor Media - "Your Success is our Business"

        Improve Your Customer Service | Get MORE Customers | Edit Any Document Easily | Free Modules | Follow Us on Facebook
        phosphormedia.com

        Comment


        • Not sure if this was a dumb question. Currenltly in the office I have all printers assigned static IPs. I wasn't sure if these static IP's were passed through to an unmanaged switch, or if it 'splits the line' and randomly assigns private IPs -which just sounds like problems to me. I don't want to use the buy and try approach so thought I'd ask.

          Comment


          • Originally posted by Gordon - Phosphor Media View Post
            I assume you are behind a router, so you have a private network that communicates through a public IP (your static IP assigned by your ISP). It doesn't generally matter one bit what goes on within your private network. A dumb switch is exactly what you need.
            Ah, okay thanks. I posted clarification at the same time as your response it seems. So looks like I would be okay then? Thanks.

            Comment


            • No, your router most likely 'hands out' IPs to all of your devices (PCs, printers, servers, mobile thingies). If the device requests a specific static IP OR the router has a 'record' of the device and it's static IP, then that's what you get. Otherwise, the router picks the next available IP.

              The conversion of public IP to private IP is called NAT (Network Address Translation), and the 'random' aspect is really not a problem. Billions of devices use it daily.

              If you have a printer that needs a specific IP, and you have set it up in some internal configuration page, then it will request THAT IP. As long as the router didn't give it out already, you're fine.

              I would re-assess why you need static IPs. For most LANs, they are completely superfluous. I use them in my own LAN, but I'm a networking geek.
              Gordon Currie
              Phosphor Media - "Your Success is our Business"

              Improve Your Customer Service | Get MORE Customers | Edit Any Document Easily | Free Modules | Follow Us on Facebook
              phosphormedia.com

              Comment


              • Thanks Gordon. That's what I needed to know.

                I am using them because in the past I've had occasional problems with the laptops and other network devices that go home and come back, server restarts where there would be an IP conflict when they came back up, some automated backups, sometimes the quickbooks server would have a conflict too etc. Usually it was an easy fix - just /flushdns reboot or whatever but my assignments aren't limited to IT so I'm usually buried with graphic design, trade show stuff, the Miva store etc and I find that I just get less people calling out to me about connection problems with the key devices are on static. Might be different now as I've done the static for a few years now, but not wanting to risk adding additional grief to my day. :)

                Thanks for the detailed response.

                Comment


                • Unintelligent switch would be exactly what you need; the router will continue handing out addresses via DHCP, and the upstream device (possibly the router itself) would simply learn that several devices' ethernet addresses are downstream on that one single port. The dumb switch will forward frames in and out of its ports depending on what device they're intended for. You can continue to do static and the DHCP-based systems will be able to access them; static for printers is quite common on corporate networks as there is often a need to get into their web interfaces for management tasks.
                  David Hubbard
                  CIO
                  Miva
                  [email protected]
                  http://www.miva.com

                  Comment


                  • sheesh...much easier just to get a 12 year old...bonus when they grow up and get a job that can support YOU :)
                    Bruce Golub
                    Phosphor Media - "Your Success is our Business"

                    Improve Your Customer Service | Get MORE Customers | Edit CSS/Javascript/HTML Easily | Make Your Site Faster | Get Indexed by Google | Free Modules | Follow Us on Facebook
                    phosphormedia.com

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X

                    This website uses cookies to identify visitors, track visitors to our website, store login session information and to remember your user preferences. By continuing to use this site you agree to our use of cookies. Learn More.

                    This website uses cookies. By continuing to use this site you agree to our use of cookies. Learn More.

                    Accept